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Garden-nerd Wild Flower Seed Bombs
SGD $10.00
Description

PRODUCT

Seed Bombs are a quick way to disperse seeds into a barren area of land. Simply throw the Seed Bombs onto the ground, the sunlight and rain will induce growth in the seeds and soon you will have a garden full of beautiful wildflowers.

Each package comes with 5 seed bombs ready to be thrown into pots, gardens or your farm. The seeds include:
- Butterfly Blue Pea
- Chinese Violet
- Garden Balsam
- Spanish Needle
- Basil

These seeds have been specially selected to tolerate and improve bad clayish soil and encourage pollinators (such as bees, butterflies, moths) into establish in your garden space.

Please do not throw Seed Bombs into public spaces (eg parks) as that might disrupt the wildlife in the area.


HISTORY

Seedbombs are an ancient Japanese practice called Tsuchi Dango, meaning ‘Earth Dumpling’ (because they are made from earth). They were reintroduced in 1938 by the Japanese microbiologist/ farmer and philosopher Masanobu Fukuoka (1913–2008), author of The One Straw Revolution. Fukuoka led the way into the world of sustainable agriculture by initiating ‘natural farming’. His methods were simple and produced no pollution. His technique used no machines or chemicals and almost no weeding. Seedbombing was part of Fukuoka’s annual farming regime. He believed that Mother Nature takes care of the seeds we sow and decides which crops to provide us with, like a process of natural selection, because ultimately nature decides what will grow and when germination will occur, be that in 7 days or several seasons away. Fukuoka grew vegetables like wild plants – he called it ‘semi wild’. He seedbombed on riverbanks, roadsides and wasteland and allowed them to ‘grow up’ with the weeds. He believed that vegetables grown in this way – including Japanese radish, carrots, burdock, onions and turnips – are stronger than most people think. He’d add clover to his vegetable mixes because it acted as a living mulch and conditioned the soil.



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